From obesity and food obsession to true health | LIMITED TIME OFFER !

    Jill Clark, of Troy, lost nearly 200 pounds with the help of a weight loss coach. Now she works as a coach to help others do the same.

Jill Clark, of Troy, lost nearly 200 pounds with the help of a weight loss coach. Now she works as a coach to help others do the same.

Photo by Patricia O'Blenes

    Jill Clark, of Troy, said the food in her house was largely clean, as in unprocessed products, though treats occasionally slip.

Jill Clark, of Troy, said the food in her house was largely clean, as in unprocessed products, though treats occasionally slip.

Photo by Patricia O'Blenes

TROY – Almost seven years ago and Troy's Jill Clark decided she had just enough.

At 321 pounds, she accompanied her children to the bus stop six doors from her home. By the time she returned, she was sweating and out of breath.

"I have been obese all my life, probably since the age of 10 or 11. I have not noticed that it was a problem before my teens and I was heavy throughout high school and at the university, "Clark said. "And then I got comfortable and I became lazy. I met my husband, had children, struggled to lose weight, and it is this classic story of mothers taking care of everyone except themselves.

Realizing that she had a problem was the first step in redesigning her health and well-being, Clark said. The second step was to determine the plan that would be best for him.

"I had joined a weight loss program and had done it many times in my life. I do not know why I thought it would be different. But I was in a meeting that morning and it took me about three years to lose 100 pounds, which was amazing, "she explained. "I was physically healthier, but I was mentally disordered. I became obsessed with food and that's all I thought about all day. I knew I could not do it anymore, and then I handed about 10 pounds, which made me very scared. "

In search of a new approach, Clark met a health coach.

Both have developed a structured plan that focuses less on food than on mentality. This allowed Clark to lose the last 75 pounds she kept for about a year and a half.

"I would say that I eat really clean – not low in crazy carbs, certainly not ceto by any means. But I read a lot of labels, "she said. "I feed my body in a different way. I eat six times a day in smaller amounts, which contributes to my energy. "

Donald Larson, nutritionist, coach, owner and general manager of Gold's Gym Detroit, is not surprised when he learns that a diet plan has not worked in the long run. It's the nature of diets, he says: they're not meant to last a lifetime.

"People who go on a fad diet are usually the ones who bounce the most," Larson said. "It's like (an addict) who will try to use drugs until they reach the bottom."

Larson, like Clark, does not advise anyone to remove the carbohydrates from his diet to lose weight, because that will come back when they give up that slice of bread. He advises his clients to use a carbohydrate cycle process, according to which one will only eat carbs a few days a week, so his body learns to use fats as energy rather than glucose them. days without carbs.

In addition to this, customers tend to come to Larson because they want to incorporate exercise into their transformation. It's a good idea, he says, but stay interesting.

"You have to do more than one thing. That's why there are all these fitness programs in the shops, like kickboxing and cycling, and I have all integrated them into classes here. You have to make it interesting for them to enjoy it. They will not come if it's a chore, "he said.

Clark suffers from heart disease that limits her ability to exercise, but she says it just means that she has to adapt her health plan to really focus on what's going on. she controls, namely her nutrition and mental health. These habits also extend to her family, causing her husband to live healthier and lose 100 pounds.

Now she is working as a health coach to help others find the unique habits that are right for them. When clients make an appointment with her, they tend to really want to create a life for themselves and their families.

Larson agreed. He said that it was difficult to change lifestyle habits, especially eating habits. So, when someone is ready to engage with a coach or coach to improve his health, he knows that he is on the road to success.

"Typically, when people come here, they have reached a certain point where they want a change. If they come here and engage me, they are ready to make that change. And that's the biggest part of the transformation: they have to be really ready to do it, "he said.

From obesity and food obsession to true health | LIMITED TIME OFFER !
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